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Topic: Japanese aircraft in the attack, Markings and colors< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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David Aiken Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 14 2002,9:12  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Aloha All,
For some time, I have been posting drawings and many of the photos upon which the drawings were based for Japanese aircraft involved in the Pearl Harbor Attack at http://communities.msn.com/japanesemodelaircraft/replicajan1990.msnw

The basic source is the lengthy article "Shinjuwan no 101 Ki" [Pearl Harbor and 101 Aircraft] by H. Yoshimura with M. Asano and myself. This was a five year collaboration from 1985 until the Japanese magazine Re-Pu-Ri-Ka [Replica] came out with the article in Jan 1990.

Along with that "101 Aircraft" Replica article, I wrote an article on the American Technical Intelligence Investigation of aircraft recovered from the Pearl Harbor Attack illustrated with US intelligence drawings and photos made during the investigation. This is also posted at: http://communities.msn.com/japanes....or.msnw

After the article appeared, another publication appeared: "Shinjuwan Kogekitai" [Pearl Harbor Attack Units] by K. Osuo, with artwork by S. Nohara [Model Art Special #378].  The artwork was based in part on our work, but -alas- has many errors.

Our Replica effort was highly received in Japan and quickly sold out. Yet, as noted, publications may contain errors. Our Jan 1990 effort had some errors. So when Replica wanted to reprint the "Shinjuwan no 101 Ki" article for their July 1992 edition, we made another companion article with corrections, additions, sources, and included many of the photos as well. The above noted URL continues with that effort.

Added to this, a lengthy discussion continues on the colors of the Japanese aircraft. Some witnesses and reports speak of "mustard" color on some planes, green on others, and yet gray on yet more. Relics are a source for some of these colors, yet a host of problems raised their head. The eyes of the observer was called into question, and the metamerism caused by different light during observation, and/or chemical interaction of the color with exposure, time, and with the undercoat colors. So I have posted many of these relics with a variety of the colors used at Pearl Harbor and at other actions at: http://communities.msn.com/japanes....or.msnw

Sidnei Maneta followed the above studies quite carefully. His color artwork has compiled the Japanese aircraft of 7 Dec 1941

If you know of Japanese relics from Pearl Harbor or later actions which might help with this topic, or which might help determine serials numbers, tail codes, or crew identifications at Pearl Harbor, please contact me. If you need a relic identified by Japanese crew or more information about your relic, please contact me. No, I am not a relic collector, as I am only interested in photos of such items, but I know of select museums which may be interested.

Cheers,
David Aiken, Shinjuwan Sakusen Sensei
a Director: Pearl Harbor History Associates, Inc.


Edited by David Aiken on Jun. 20 2006,5:49

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Cheers,

David Aiken, a Director
Pearl Harbor History Associates, Inc.

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 Post Number: 2
David Aiken Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Mar. 18 2003,11:59 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Aloha nui loa All,
The study of the Pearl Harbor Attack has produced a host of unique tactical facts. I had the good fortune to have collaborated with two top historians, M. Asano and H. Yoshimura, and that effort "Shinjuwan no 101 Ki" [Pearl Harbor and 101 Aircraft] was printed in Re-Pu-Ri-Ka (Replica) magazine, Jan 1990. I have posted most of the illustrations.  Replica, Jan 1990, was reprinted in July 1992.

Generally, in the Japanese dive bombing, the lead plane of a Shotai [three plane flight] selected the target and the following two planes then added their bombs to that target.

However, In the Hawai Sakusen caused a slight change in this practice. To seek out more targets, the individual D3A were encouraged to seek out targets other than the target selected by the Shotaicho [flight leader].

During practice of this challenge, the Japanese noted that D3As making such solo attacks on widely separated targets had great difficulty getting back into formation for mutual protection against possible enemy fighters.

In interviews of several veterans, my research cohorts M. Asano and H. Yoshimura discovered that to solve the re-forming problem... many dive bomb leaders had brightly colored paint schemes added to their aircraft. These special planes even received nicknames based on the paint schemes. These special schemes were discarded as experience raised in the early months of 1942.

In Jan 1990, M. Asano let some of this information out and Model Art Special #378 "Shinjuwan Kogekitai" [Pearl Harbor Attack Units] (Oct 1991 release) had S. Nohara do a rendering of one of Lt Commander Egusa's two D3As...a green scheme called "Tora Moyo"....which was NOT flown at Pearl Harbor.

In March 2001 Scale Aviation magazine, M. Asano made more of this information public. I have posted the three schemes cited in that Scale Aviation issue... These are three schemes not as well known as the one viewed on many plastic kits. All three were used at Pearl Harbor:

Egusa's D3A [used at Pearl Harbor]. Egusa led the second attack wave's D3As. According to the research of H. Yoshimura and M. Asano, in 1941, Lt Cdr Egusa had two different D3A aircraft which were garishly painted. Both had unique schemes. The wild scheme in the scan is called "Jaja Uma" [and "Akatora"] and was used on 7 Dec 1941. The other D3A was also cited by Kunio Kosemoto, a Soryu pilot, in his autobiography Kanbaku Ichidai (Tokyo: Konnichi no Wadai-sha) as used both pre-war and in the French Indochina combat. "Tora Moyo" has a green scheme seen in many plastic model kits.

Shun Nakagawa's D3A...Shun Nakagawa, the Hiryu D3A commander at Pearl Harbor, also made the topic public in his article "Dive Bombing Cruiser St. Louis" in Mikokai Shashin ni Miru Shinjuwan Kogeki [Pearl Harbor Attack in Unpublished Photos] (Tokyo: Rekishi Dokuhon, Bessatsu; 1990). He confirmed that every command aircraft during the Hawaii Operation were in gaudy markings. The reason given confirms the research by H. Yoshimura and M. Asano, that based on training and past combat, dive bombers had become widely scattered and it was difficult to reassemble.

Lt Commander Takahashi led first wave dive bombers His fuselage was painted orange and nicknamed "Dora Neko".

For more new information on the two basic paint scheme colors used by these D3As and undersurface colors applied to B5Ns used at Pearl, see: camouflage info!

Hope this helps,

Edited by David Aiken on --

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Cheers,

David Aiken, a Director
Pearl Harbor History Associates, Inc.

Keep the largest WWII website on line!
Join NOW: $25
P.O. Box 1007
Stratford, CT  06615

http://www.pearlharbor-history.org/
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