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Topic: Japanese attack route, japanese attack route< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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Fireman Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 11 2001,6:46  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

     Hello my name is Fireman. I am the cousin of Henson Taylor Shouse F1c, who died aboard the Utah. I have a question for the experts. In the new movie, when they are having an ops briefing in the Navy Department, one of the intel guys talks about the japanese hiding their fleet in a rather large area. What was the route of the Japanese Fleet to Pearl Harbor. It was obviusly an effective one. Thanks for your help.

      Fireman

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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 11 2001,6:59 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

The best way to understand the route of the Striking Force is to picture the route on a globe.  The carriers left from the northern most islands of Japan, went due East until they were almost directly north of Hawaii, then swung South for the final run in.  

This took them clear of normal shipping channels, and through an area the US considered an "empty sea" because it was so little used.  Shipping in the Pacific had already be severely reduced.  The European powers were not sending much into the Pacific, and the US and Japan had already ended any traffic between themselves.  A scouting trip made by a Japanese commercial vessel in November had verified that nobody used the route.  

The Japanese only had to be quiet and avoid contact with anyone and they would have the approach "in the bag".  They were careful and lucky, and suceeded in their plans.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 19 2001,10:20 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

#Moderation Mode

Aloha All,
Moving to "Japanese Ships"
Cheers,

Moved here

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Philip Payton Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 07 2001,8:51 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

in relation to this question,

what was the japanese escape route? did they head due north or did they attack any other targets on thier way home?

thanx phil

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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 07 2001,10:40 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I do not believe there are any confirmed reports of the Japanese strike force making any contact with other ships during the voyage to attack Hawaii.  The Hollywood film "The Final Countdown" had a fictional attack on a private yacht that may have spotted the fleet, but it was done purely as part of the film's plot to involve a U.S. Senator and his secretary in the confrontation between the USS Nimitz, which had warped back in time to the day of the attack, and the approaching Japanese Task Force.   The whole purpose of the northern route was to avoid contact and insure the strike force would arrive north of Oahu undetected.
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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jul. 07 2001,12:26 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

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Quote: from Philip Payton on 7:51 am on July 7, 2001
in relation to this question,

what was the japanese escape route? did they head due north or did they attack any other targets on thier way home?

thanx phil

Here's a picture of the route, as best we know it:



Note that the location given for Shiriya, which is a supposed give away to the movement of the Kido Butai, would put her roughly halfway between Tokyo and Wake Island.  She would have been over 2,000 miles from Pearl on the day of the attack.

However, somebody made some money of the poor saps that bought that book, so more will be coming.  

As for contacts with ships of other nations, the Japanese denied this, and no proof has ever been found that they were spotted.  (Delusions don't count as proof.)

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JL Johnson Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 24 2001,12:05 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Nice map, Larry.

One minor addition: on the return voyage, two carriers, Hiryu and Soryu I believe, detached with escorts to support the troubled landings at Wake.  They lost several planes and crews, including the bombardier widely credited with the fatal hit on Arizona's forward magazine.

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David Aiken Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 24 2001,5:54 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Hi JL Johnson,
Yes, Hiryu and Soryu lost several planes and crews at Wake Island [including that bombardier, Petty Officer First Class N. Kanai, credited -erroneously- in Dr Gordon Prange's At Dawn We Slept with the fatal hit on Arizona's forward magazine].
HTH,
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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 24 2001,6:28 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

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Quote: from JL Johnson on 11:05 am on Aug. 24, 2001
Nice map, Larry.

One minor addition: on the return voyage, two carriers, Hiryu and Soryu I believe, detached with escorts to support the troubled landings at Wake.  They lost several planes and crews, including the bombardier widely credited with the fatal hit on Arizona's forward magazine.

Yeah, that diviation is shown in a map from Dougie Mac's Reports.

Now, if the Japanese carriers could have been "rounding Diamond Head as we speak", it was also possible that the USN carriers were lurking somewhere out there in ambush.  Does anybody know when the Kido Butai got a good feel for the location of the American bird farms?


For a larger, more detailed view, click here

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 24 2001,7:48 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yes, Hiryu and Soryu lost several planes and crews at Wake Island [including that bombardier, Petty Officer First Class N. Kanai, credited -erroneously- in Dr Gordon Prange's At Dawn We Slept with the fatal hit on Arizona's forward magazine].
HTH,

It was most likely Prange where I read that, though I've read a few books recently.  I wondered how on Earth one could ever tell who did -- or who did not -- drop a given bomb on such a horrible day.  My understanding was that the horizontal bombers flew in echelons and dropped their munitions in succession.

In defense of Prange, as I recall his ID of Kanai was somewhat equivocal, saying he was "credited" by various sources as the bombardier.

But David, since you are a professional, I am very curious and would be fascinated to hear why you think it was not Kanai, and who you think did drop the bomb.  It must be a very difficult thing to pin down.

Thanks for your response.

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