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Topic: The USS Arizona, Why didn't they ever raise the ship?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
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natasharaye Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 19 2001,1:52  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was wondering this and can't find the answer on the net. With all of those bodies still to this day in the uss arizonia, and with the ship that close to the surface, why did they never raise the ship? I feel they should have done this and gave the remains a proer burial? Can any one help me out here?
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Tracy White Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 28 2001,2:13 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

There were a number of reasons but ultimately it came down to the heavy damage and dangerous conditions.

The US Navy lost most of it's battleship fleet during the attack and all of them were damaged at least. There was a prioritization of salvage work, with the least-damaged getting repaired first so that we could have at least some back in service quickly. Because of this the Arizona and Oklahoma were on the bottom of the list.

There was some thought about raising just the stern of the Arizona but some exploratory work by Navy Salvage Divers revealed that her back had been broken by the explosion.  Edward  Raymer covers this in more detail in his book "Descent into Darkness" which deals largely on the salvage done in Pearl Harbor.

There were several near deaths on the Arizona during salvage work done on her due to the very dangerous conditions. That, combined with the extreme damage and loss of life lead the Navy to believe that it would be better and wiser to leave the Arizona as a tomb for those who died aboard her

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Let's see what this does...

Tracy White
http://www.ResearcherAtLarge.com
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Warhawk1271941 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 28 2001,10:13 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I was just thinking, since the Arizona is decaying, there should be some way to prevent her from disappearing forever. I have come to think that maybe the people of the US should band together and preserve this national icon of a national tragedy. We should build a permanant dry dock where she lays at now, they could lift her gently out of the water til the bottom of the dry dock is finished, then work on the outter walls and pump out the water. This is how the Arizona with her men should be, to stand as a reminder that we're not going to give up the ship and that of her crew to the sea and be lost forever. In the words of Oliver Hazzard Perry, "We have met the enemy and they are ours." And the flag he flew over the US Brig Niagra "DON'T GIVE UP THE SHIP"
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 29 2001,9:03 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Warhawk,
First off, please use you real name here so that we may get to know you better.   Thank You.

Secondly, as appropriate as your idea may be, it would be nearly impossible to "gently lift" anything as large as that hull and/or as fragile.   What was once a strong steel structure is now extremely breakable by structural standards.   Between the damage inflicted at the time of the attack, and the ravages of time, saltwater and gravity; the ARIZONA's hull would not at all tolerate such a disturbance.    The tunneling required to run lifting slings under her might well break the hull by itself.   Not to mention the danger to the divers and the overall cost of such a venture.

Great idea, but at the risk of sounding defeatist, I personally don't think that it would work.

Best Regards,

Brian O'Connor
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Warhawk1271941 Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 30 2001,4:33 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

First off my names Will!

Second I think the plan would work under some circumstances, take a look at the Moniter thats out in the Atlantic Ocean since the Civil War. The wreck out there has been there longer than the Arizona and is rapidly decaying dispite having been depth charged by some destroyers in WWII. But it should be feasable to "delay" the decay on the Arizona, there are many steps to take and the risk would be high but it would be done slowly and gently. And as you say it would be impossible to drain the oil out from the bilges, all we have to do is dig a small trench under the Arizona and tap from there. Yes I know the wreck is dangerous now, but with some help it could be saved from the ravages of the sea. This is why we fail sometimes, we give up our most tresured relects and then our grandchildren will ask the same question, "Why didn't we save the Arizona?" I don't think that the Arizona and the men still inside her to be nothing more than a pile of dust on the bottom of the harbor, there should be more to that then just dust. Wouldn't you like to see her go on so she could be seen by your great great grandchildren? I clearly think sometime should be done! That's my opinion!! If we dont save her and her men then a valuable piece of history would be lost forever.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 30 2001,3:53 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Will,
Having been an propulsion systems engineer for the twenty years that I served in the U.S. Navy, and a "hard hat" diver for the last eleven; I can assure you that the hull of the ARIZONA cannot be lifted "bodily",( ie. as a single unit ), without immense, irrepairable  damage.   Additionally, if it were to break up, we would not only have prematurely destroyed it, but will have caused serious environmental damage throught the gross release of fuel oil from the hull, and heavy metals and other pollutants from the mud.
The hull is over 600 feet long, is sunk in the mud nearly up to her design waterline, is sitting on an angled porous rock shelf, and has over half her length broken up internally.   Simply put, trying to move this hull is not a good idea.  
For a more feasible plan;  build a tastefully designed, floating oil control boom around her to catch the oil as it comes out.   Allow ARIZONA and her crew their deserved respite, and let time and the elements take their course.    And most important; don't ever forget what happened here, because the evidence is not permanent, nor was it intended to be.

Respectfully,

Brian O'Connor
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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Dec. 30 2001,4:08 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

"Allow ARIZONA and her crew their deserved respite, and let time and the elements take their course.  "

"As you came from the sea, so shall you return, and find repose therein, for thy labors are finished and thy reward is at hand."

Requiescat in pace.

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"Sunday's horoscope is noteworthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." - "Your Horoscope," Los Angeles Evening Herald Express, Saturday, December 6, 1941
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2002,1:17 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I have a question about all the people that survived in the bowels of the Arizona for days afterwards.  IF this is true, how come they couldn't get some of them out?  And is it true they bipassed them to get other things out of the ship rather then the crew?  

Eric Tyler

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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2002,5:22 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

I think you're confusing the Arizona with the Oklahoma.  

"And is it true they bipassed them to get other things out of the ship rather then the crew? "

Would you?  Would you allow the recovery of mere material while your shipmates and friends were dying?  Would you remain silent about such an act for decades afterwards if it did happen?  The people at Pearl in the days after the attack speak of the huge, exhausting efforts to rescue men, not material.  

I'm confused as to why this topic even comes up.  It's like asking if people syphon the gas out of a car at the scene of a crash instead of helping the victims.  Rationally, what would a person do?  

I'm not trying to slam anyone for discussing this, if the rumors are out there we need to clear them up, but if you stop and think for a minute it seems easy to say, "that's really a strange thing to say."

Larry J

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"Sunday's horoscope is noteworthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." - "Your Horoscope," Los Angeles Evening Herald Express, Saturday, December 6, 1941
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crusaderbard Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 11 2002,1:45 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

Sorry, I'm real new at WW2 historical study.  I study history, but have concentrated all my past studies on the middle ages and the Revoloutionary war/colonial periods.  I had a grandfather in the war but he was stationed in Italy working to keep planes in the air and have recently become very interested in WW2.  Thats why I asked this, cause when I heard it, it kinda bothered me as it was kinda out there..,  thanks for clearing that up for me.

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