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Topic: USS Nevada< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 11
Fortress Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2001,3:07  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Thanks for you help, Mike.  I just ordered the book and look forward to reading it!  I'll get back to you as I have more questions.    

By the way, do you have an answer as to why the Nevada was the only battleship able to sortie?  

Thanks for you help,
Cindy

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 Post Number: 12
Mike Wenger Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 01 2001,3:30 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Yes...

Pennsylvania was in Drydock.

Maryland and Tennessee were inboard two other battleships (Oklahoma and West Virginia).

California, Oklahoma, West Virginia, Arizona were sunk, or so badly damaged that they could not sortie.

That left Nevada.  Being on the northern end of BB Row, she failed to attract as much attention from the Japanese... only 1-2 torpedo planes (1 hit forward) and one group of five horizontal bombers (all misses).

As I recall (would have to go to my microfilm to be sure), one boiler was lit, with another on stand-by, so she had a head start.

Regards,

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Joan Mecteau Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 02 2001,3:05 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

A deciding factor in the Nevada's ability to get underway during the sneak attack was Ensign Taussig's primonition which caused him to order a second boiler lighted during the 2000-2400 watch Dec. 6. On the morning of Dec. 7, the boilers already had 60 pounds of steam at the time of the attack. Other ships had to start from "cold iron" taking them much longer to get under way.
This is taken from the book Operation Crossroads by Edwin Swaney.
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 Post Number: 14
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2001,9:38 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Joan and Mike,
  Thanks for the information.  The boilers being lit/or on line really gives me the answer.  I was thinking that it could take up to 6 hours for "cold" boilers to build enough steam to get underway. (Of course, I could be wrong here.)

  I guess it just goes to show that you should always listen to that little voice in the back of your mind!

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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2001,9:52 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

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I was thinking that it could take up to 6 hours for "cold" boilers to build enough steam to get underway.

Depends on how scared you are.  I've seen panic starts get a modern CG moving in under an hour.  We cheated by cutting shore steam into the boilers and heating the piping up that way.  BuShips told us we were nuts.  Trashed the boilerwater chemistry, but we flushed the kettle later.

If the watertenders back then pushed it to the edge of safety they could cut the boilers into the main in about the same time.  It requires being ready to write about how you didn't do it exactly right and now we have to replace a boiler, but as I said, if your scared enough...

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Fortress Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2001,10:31 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Larry,
  I'd love to hear more about this, and particularly what the Nevada may have done to get started.

I seem to remember that at the 50th Anniversary of Pearl Harbor (at the ceremony held on the Arizona Memorial with Pres. Bush) that there was a man from the boiler room of the Nevada honored.  I wish I could remember it more clearly, but I believe he may have lost his sight as a result of his actions to save the ship that day.  I'd love to learn more about him as well.

Thanks for the info!
Cindy

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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2001,10:40 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

"I'd love to hear more about this, and particularly what the Nevada may have done to get started. "

I can't speak for the snipes on Nevada, but since they had steam up in one boiler their job was a lot easier than going from cold iron.  You can move on one boiler, but the throttlemen had better keep an eye on the steam pressure on the main.

You can also put a steam blanket on the cold boilers to jump start the warm-up process.  ("steam blanket" is the term I was trying to remember in my last post.  Very self-descriptive term.)

My own experience was one of those things that never made the news in the States.  Picture the 7th Fleet fleeing Yokosuka like a flock of startled pigeons.

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 Post Number: 18
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 04 2001,10:51 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

My own experience was one of those things that never made the news in the States.  Picture the 7th Fleet fleeing Yokosuka like a flock of startled pigeons.

Now THAT is something I'd like to hear about!   Actually it brought to mind a story I read about the tankers trailing the Japanese Fleet to Pearl getting lost every night and having to be rounded up every morning by the destroyers.  The "flock of startled pigeons" reference made me think of it.

Can you tell me more of your story? I had one uncle in the Navy on carriers in WWII.  My father was a Marine on Guam and I had two uncles in the Army Air Corps.  I can never hear enough stories, and I honor you all.
Cindy

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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jun. 05 2001,5:55 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

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Quote: from Fortress on 9:51 am on June 4, 2001
My own experience was one of those things that never made the news in the States.  Picture the 7th Fleet fleeing Yokosuka like a flock of startled pigeons.

This actually happened in 198(-), when an anonymous tip led to the discovery of two homemade "human torpedoes" in a shed on the Sagami Wan (Tokyo Bay). (Actually a kind of jet ski instead of a torpedo, but that was the intent.)   That was bad enough, but there were FOUR cradles.  So, to the best of the information the Japanese police had, two of these mothers were missing.  Dozens of photos of the US Naval Base at Yokosuka were also found there.   ComSeventhFleet decided he didn't want to be in port for a while, so we jacked up and hauled for the horizon.  There was some coverage of this in the Japanese media, but it seems to have never been covered in the States.

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Mr. SP Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Feb. 05 2007,2:41 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

The USS Nevada was the ship my uncle Frank Ewing served aboard. Uncle Frank was not assigned to the Nevada until the ship was returned to service after the attack on Pearl Harbor.
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