CLICK TO SUPPORT
PEARL HARBOR ATTACKED


Search Members Help

» Welcome Guest
[ Log In :: Register ]

1 members are viewing this topic
>Guest

 

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]

reply to topic new topic new poll
Topic: USS Utah's armament..., Why was it not salvaged?< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 1
Jim A Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 25
Joined: Jun. 2003

Member Rating: None
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 25 2005,11:24  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

This may be covered elsewhere, but I am just curious why the Utah's AA armament was not salvaged.  I was looking through some of my PH books and saw the perspective drawings of the Utah and Arizona.  On Utah, it appears as if the 5"/25-Cal. weapons were left in place.  I can only guess they may have been damaged and not worth salvage.  I remember reading that some similar weapons were "robbed" from West Virginia to replace damaged units on Pennsylvania.  Were the units on Utah just unaccessable due to the orientation of the ship after she rolled or was she just so low on the totem pole of priorities that there salvage was not required?  Just thoughts....  Thx
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 2
Brian OConnor Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 231
Joined: Apr. 2001

Member Rating: None
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 25 2005,10:53 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

UTAH was fairly low on the priorities list and in fact was not rolled back over toward Ford Island until late 1943, using the same parbuckling gear used on OKLAHOMA. I have not seen any documentation as to the condition of those guns by that time, although I'nm confident that they used what they could. I do know that some equipment and valuables were salvaged earlier.   Frankly, I was rather surprised to see all the armament in place when we dove her in the late 1980's.

Brian


Edited by Brian OConnor on Sep. 25 2005,10:55
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 3
Dan Madsen Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 20
Joined: Feb. 2004

Member Rating: None
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 27 2005,10:22 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Utah certainly was low on the priority list, though recovery of her guns wasn't. At least initially. On 21 December her former captain, Jim Steele, who was now in charge of the salvage operation, wrote that the need for her 5-inch batteries was urgent and that they would investigate having them removed before she was righted. That was about the last information I came across regarding her guns. Divers surveyed her in early January to ensure she was stable on the bottom, and then for the next month a team recovered ammunition, mostly 5/51, 5/38 and 5/25 shells from her forward magazines. The work became too dangerous and the effort was abandoned, not the least because the Utah was so low on the priority list that the recovery team had trouble obtaining men to work on her. In addition, diving in these inverted and damaged ships was in it's infancy and the teams had not yet worked out the techniques which would later lead to such a remarkable safety record. It just wasn't worth the effort and danger at that point. Her hull was abandoned in early February. The righting tackle and headframes from the Oklahoma project were put in place in the latter part of 1943 and she was rotated between 9 February and 3 March 1944, until it became apparent she was sinking into the mud rather than rolling on the bottom.
It was interesting to see how the thinking and planning evolved around the Utah salvage as priorities, personnel, and the war situation changed and as different entities weighed in with suggestions and recommendations. It truly was a work in progress, rather than a firm plan, from the time she rolled over till the time the last divers left her in mid-March 1944.


--------------
Dan Madsen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
 Post Number: 4
Dan Madsen Search for posts by this member.

Avatar



Group: Members
Posts: 20
Joined: Feb. 2004

Member Rating: None
PostIcon Posted on: Sep. 27 2005,5:26 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

"I remember reading that some similar weapons were "robbed" from West Virginia to replace damaged units on Pennsylvania."

There certainly was a lot of cannabilizing of material, particularly armament, in the days after the attack when it was believed possible the Japanese would return. 5/25's were taken from the West Virginia for use as shore batteries and to replace batteries on the Chicago and Salt Lake City. A 5/51 went to the Pennsylvania, another to the army. A 5/25 from the Tennessee also went to the Pennsylvania, and Helena guns went to the Phoenix. Downes and Shaw 5/38's went to Ewa as a shore battery, and a Cassin 5/38, minus the shield, went to the Shaw for her trip to the mainland. It was no wonder Steele was particularly anxious about the possibility of recovering the Utah's guns just 2 weeks after the attack.


--------------
Dan Madsen
Offline
Top of Page Profile Contact Info 
3 replies since Sep. 25 2005,11:24 < Next Oldest | Next Newest >

[ Track This Topic :: Email This Topic :: Print this topic ]


 
reply to topic new topic new poll

» Quick Reply USS Utah's armament...
iB Code Buttons
You are posting as:

Do you wish to enable your signature for this post?
Do you wish to enable emoticons for this post?
Track this topic
View All Emoticons
View iB Code




Spring into Action Banner