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Topic: Best and Worst, Best and Worst written works out there< Next Oldest | Next Newest >
 Post Number: 11
Edison McIntyre Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: May 25 2001,10:27  Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

1) Can anyone supply the name Robin Moore's conspiracy-spoof novel, mentioned above, as well as publication info? I'd love to find a copy too.

2) I have long considered Walter Lord's "Day of Infamy" the best introductory book about Pearl Harbor, especially for a non-specialist with no strong interest in the event. I first read it about 1962, and over the years I've often revisited it just for the enjoyment of reading it. And, despite its age, I always considered it reasonably accurate for the era in which it was researched and written.  

I see in the website, however, references to "Day of Infamy" as inaccurate. I'd be grateful if a person more knowledgable than I could list the more salient errors in a post.  Did Lord ever revisit "Infamy" and write a follow-up book or article, as he did with "A Night to Remember?" Did he ever correct himself?

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 Post Number: 12
Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: May 26 2001,9:11 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Schuler, Frank and Moore, Robin. Pearl Harbor Cover-up, the. N.Y.: Pinnacle Books, 1976. 1st Edition, Second Printing. 12mo - over 6" - 7" tall. Mass Market Paperback. Very Good 277 pp. Cover lightly scuffed, rubbed. Edges/corners lightly worn/rounded, pages lightly soiled. Owners ink stamp marking on front page.

"Very Good" refers to the condition of the book, not the contents.

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 Post Number: 13
Matt Runtas Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 14 2001,8:50 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

In my opinion, Walter Lords "Day of Infamy" is the best book about the attack on Pearl Harbor.
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 Post Number: 14
Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 14 2001,9:46 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

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Quote: from Matt Runtas on 7:50 pm on Aug. 14, 2001
In my opinion, Walter Lords "Day of Infamy" is the best book about the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Tell us what you liked about it.  I always appreciate hearing new critiques of books on this topic.

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Matt Runtas Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 15 2001,12:17 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Well I just liked the fact that it covered from the time that the Ward and the PBY Catalina saw the midget sub and the way it went all through the end in extreme detail in the way the events unfolded. Great book. What are our opinions(if you read it)
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Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Aug. 15 2001,6:50 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

It's  been a long time since I read it, and have read a lot of other good material since then.  Is it Lord's book that has the Jaegersfontein listed as the first "Allied" warship to open fire on the enemy at Pearl Harbor?  I've read that the captain of the Dutch ship mentions that his gun wasn't in service at the time.  Interestingly, I saw a doc-film recently that mentioned that Jaegersfontein took a group of US officers to Japan in July, 1941.  

Gordon Prange's books are the most exhaustively researched available right now.  It might be time to write a new blow-by-blow account of the battle itself, and another on the events that lead up to it.  I know one is needed to address the mythology of event.  A trilogy, perhaps?

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 Post Number: 17
HornetFLA Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 08 2002,7:26 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Has anyone read "Pearl Harbor Final Judgement" by Maj Henry C. Clausen and Bruce Lee?  First printing was 1992, new revised printing 2001.

I just finished it and was wondering what others thought?  Especially the listing of "the 14 most responsible men for the disaster at Pearl Harbor".

Pretty amazing I thought.
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Dennis Morris Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2002,2:32 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

Based on Larry's recommendation of Robin Moore's book I purchased a used copy. I really did want to see what the worst could be. Actually it is better than Stinnett.  Is it really satirical or am I a bit dense?
Dennis Morris

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 Post Number: 19
Larry Jewell Search for posts by this member.
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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 17 2002,4:44 Skip to the previous post in this topic. Skip to the next post in this topic. Ignore posts   QUOTE

If you have the paperback copy then you should have that wonderful photo of some unknown book with pages ripped out on the cover?  "There was a conspiracy and this photo proves it." under the picture?

First, we have absolutely no information as to what book that is.  Second, if there was a mistake in the phone book would the phone company go around and correct every copy out there?  Thousands of copies of the PHA were released, but that cover makes you think "them" deleted evidence from one copy and that's good enough to hide that info forever.  Stupid concept?  Exactly.

Additional silly things come to mind, but I don't have copy anymore so I don't want to say exactly what they were.  All I can say is that if it wasn't meant to be a satire then that makes it even funnier.

Larry J

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"Sunday's horoscope is noteworthy because of its strange, sudden and wholly inexplicable occurrences, affecting all phases of life." - "Your Horoscope," Los Angeles Evening Herald Express, Saturday, December 6, 1941
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 Post Number: 20
Fortress Search for posts by this member.

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PostIcon Posted on: Jan. 24 2002,9:02 Skip to the previous post in this topic.  Ignore posts   QUOTE

I'd like to weigh in with my own book review of sorts. It has been interesting to read the different viewpoints on some of the same books I have.  

Since it's today (or perhaps yesterday) that in 1942 that the Roberts Commission laid the blame on the shoulders of Admiral Kimmel and General Short, I'll start with a books that gave me the most insite into these two men.

Air Raid:Pearl Harbor! Recollections of a Day of Infamy - Stillwell and Pearl Harbor Ghosts The Legacy of December 7, 1941 - Clarke.

Both of these books taught me more about Kimmel and Short than the others I've read.   Obviously, Air Raid: Pearl Harbor is a more in depth work, so there is more than in  Pearl Harbor Ghosts.   Air Raid: Pearl Harbor is textbook-like, but readable and a good reference work.   Pearl Harbor Ghosts was interesting, readable, and in some places, distrubing, but overall not a favorite.

Pearl Harbor America's Darkest Day (Time Life Books) - Wels is a good coffee table book.  Where the book falls short on copy, it more than makes up for it in photos.  It's the kind of book that will give you a good overview of the events leading up to as well as following Pearl Harbor.  

Trapped at Pearl Harbor - Escape From Battleship Oklahoma by Stephen Young is the book that actually read while in Hawaii visiting Pearl Harbor.  It is well written, fascinating, scary, sad, and I was hooked from the beginning.  I will admit, though, that I had some trouble getting my mind around some the directions and ships quarters he mentions.  However, that is more likely from my own ignorance of battleship interiors than from his lack of writing skills.  I found myself, time and time again, turning to the photos of the men of the Oklahoma to just look at the faces as Young told his story.

Descent Into Darkness by Edward Raymer is another book that I found completely interesting.  I knew little if nothing about the post December 7th salvage operations, so I found this quite informative.  The book captures some of the horror of what it must have been like to venture into these ships without playing it up for dramatic affect.  

My Pearl Harbor bible is "The Way It Wasy Pearl Harbor by Goldstein, Dillon and Wenger."  (Goldstein and Dillon along with Gordon Prange also authored another favorite of mine...Miracle at Midway)  TWIW PH is the book I automatically turn to for quick facts.  It's clear, concise and well presented.  It's been an invaluable addition to my own personal library.

The first book I ever read about Pearl Harbor was "December 7, 1941 The Day the Japanese Attacked Pearl Harbor".  It remains one of my favorites.  It's not easy reading, by any stretch of the imagination, but it's well worth the effort.  (I was reduced to writing notes in the front of the book to keep myself reminded of the Japanese facts such as which ships were in which division.)  Being the first book I read about PH, I was drinking it in and trying to learn as much as I could.  This book gave me a good foundation and sparked an even greater interest in Pearl Harbor.

My favorite book is "Day of Infamy" by Walter Lord.  DOI is not a historical text, nor is it full of coffeebook pictures.  Where it's strength lies is in the ability to put you into the shoes and the feelings of the people who actually lived through the event.  Instead of just telling you what happened or outlining the fact, it actually puts you into the action.  It gives Pearl Harbor not just one, but many human faces with the behind-the-scenes type of storytelling that keeps me coming back.

The worst book I have is John Toland's "Infamy".  
While it is readable, interesting, and told with a great deal of ...weight...I found the premise lacking.  The case was not made to my satisfaction that FDR or anyone else in the United States Government knew about the attack and let it happen.  (Of course, I admit that I went into this book with a biased opinion.)

There is my best and worst list. :)
I would be intersted in any feedback.

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Cindy
Mother of two sons in the military.

"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."
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